"Are you guys ready? Let's roll!" is an expression Todd Beamer used whenever his wife and two young sons were leaving their home for a family outing. The 32-year-old businessman and Sunday school teacher said the same thing before he and other passengers apparently took action against hijackers aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on Tuesday, shortly before the plane crashed in a western Pennsylvania field....

The jet was bobbing and changed course several times; the passengers knew they would never land in San Francisco. "They realized they were going to die. Todd said he and some other passengers were going to jump on the guy with the bomb," Lisa Beamer said. Several other passengers made phone calls from the jet before it crashed southeast of Pittsburgh: Jeremy Glick, 31; Mark Bingham, 31; and Thomas Burnett Jr. 38. Glick and Burnett said they were going to do something. Todd Beamer dropped the phone after talking to Robinson, leaving the line open. It was then that the operator heard Beamer's words: "Let's roll." Complete Story at WTC tribute

Sunday - September 22 - Recorder reveals details of Flight 93 struggle (Click to Read articles about Flight 93)

By Kelli Arena
CNN Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Officials familiar with the cockpit voice recorder on United Airlines Flight 93 -- the hijacked jet that crashed September 11 in western Pennsylvania -- say there was a "definite struggle" described as desperate and wild between hijackers and some of the passengers....Without going into details, Mueller seemed to confirm that the passengers attempted some type of takeover.

USA Today - A collection of Photos, Audios and Videos

 The unsung Heros of United Airlines - Flight 93

"Broken Dreams"
United Airlines Flight 93, Newark, N.J., to San Francisco, crashed in rural southwest Pennsylvania

  In New York

A hijacked passenger jet out of Boston, Massachusetts, crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center at 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, tearing a gaping hole in the building and setting it afire. About 18 minutes later, a second hijacked airliner, United Airlines Flight 175 from Boston, crashed into the south tower of the World Trade Center and exploded. Both buildings burned. Later in the morning the south tower and later the north tower collapsed, plummeting into the streets below. New York has reported 190 confirmed deaths and 4,957 people missing

 
 

 In Pennsylvania

A fourth hijacked airliner out of Newark, New Jersey, crashed in rural western Pennsylvania in the late morning. All of the plane's occupants, 45 people, died in the crash.

TV CNN

 In Washington, D.C

A third hijacked airliner crashed into the Pentagon, sending up a huge plume of smoke. As a result of the crash, many government buildings including the White House were evacuated for fear they could be targets as well. A portion of the builder later collapsed. The Pentagon death toll, including the plane passengers, stands at 188 -- 186 missing and presumed dead, two confirmed dead

   The World Trade Center

 The Pentagon

 The Pentagon

 

CREW - All with United Airlines:

Lorraine G. Bay, Hightstown, N.J., flight attendant
Sandra W. Bradshaw, 38, Greensboro, N.C., flight attendant, UJason Dahl, 43, Denver, Colo., captain
Wanda A. Green, 49, Linden, N.J., flight attendant
LeRoy Homer, 36, Marlton, N.J., first officer
CeeCee Lyles, Fort Myers, Fla., flight attendant
Deborah A. Welsh, 49, New York, N.Y., flight attendant

PASSENGERS:

Christian Adams, 37, Biebelsheim, Germany, foreign sales manager, German Wine Fund
Todd Beamer, 32, Cranbury, N.J., account manager, Oracle Corp.
Alan Beaven, 48, Oakland, Calif., environmental lawyer
Mark Bingham, 31, San Francisco, Calif., public relations firm owner
Deora Bodley, 20, Santa Clara, Calif., university student
Marion Britton, 53, assistant regional director, U.S. Census Bureau
Thomas E. Burnett Jr., 38, San Ramon, Calif., medical research senior executive

 

PASSENGERS:

William Cashman
Georgine Rose Corrigan, antiques and collectibles dealer
Joseph Deluca
Patrick Driscoll
Edward Felt, 41, Matawan, N.J.
Colleen Fraser, 51, Elizabeth, N.J., chairwoman, New Jersey Developmental Disabilities Council
Andrew Garcia, 62, Portola Valley, Calif.
Jeremy Glick, 31, West Milford, N.J.
Kristin Gould
Lauren Grandcolas, 38, San Rafael, Calif., sales worker, Good Housekeeping magazine
Donald F. Greene, 52, Greenwich, Conn.
Linda Gronlund, 46, Warwick, N.Y., environmental compliance, BMW
Richard Guadagno, 38, Eureka, Calif., manager, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge

 PASSENGERS:

Toshiya Kuge, 20, Tokyo, Japan, student
Hilda Marcin, 79, Budd Lake, N.J., retired teacher's aide
Waleska Martinez, 37, automation specialist, U.S. Census Bureau
Nicole Miller, 21, San Jose, Calif., student, West Valley College
Louis J. Nacke, 42, New Hope, Pa., distribution center director, Key-Bee Toys
Donald A. Peterson, 66, Spring Lake, N.J., retired president, Continental Electric Co.
Jean Hoadley Peterson, 55, Spring Lake, N.J.
Mark Rothenberg, Scotch Plains, N.J., owner, MDR Global Resources
Christine Snyder, 32, Kailua, Hawaii, arborist, Outdoor Circle
John Talignani, 72, Staten Island, N.Y., retired restaurant worker
Honor Wainio

 

 Please visit our Tribute page in honor of our own members with NYPD

WTC Tribute 2001

 

In the History of the United States: WORST UNITED STATES DISASTERS

America's ability to crush evil America under ATTACK

America!!

 FIGHT TO THE DEATH:

10/03/2001 - Updated 10:46 PM ET

Recorder catches passengers' fight with hijackers

By Kevin Johnson and Alan Levin, USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Cockpit voice recordings from United Airlines Flight 93 indicate that the hijacked jet's passengers attacked their captors and fought their way into the cockpit before the jet went down, according to data obtained Wednesday. The account is based on an ongoing analysis of the cockpit voice recorder. It provides confirmation of the passengers' heroic efforts as they fought against four terrorists who had commandeered the jet on an apparent suicide mission toward a target in Washington.

The digital recording, according to officials with knowledge of its contents, picks up sounds of people shouting and screaming in the cabin and cockpit shortly before the crash. But a high level of background noise has made it difficult for investigators to interpret exactly what was being said or done during the final minutes of the flight.
Also unclear from the recording is who was at the controls of the jet — the hijackers or the passengers — when it slammed into a field in Pennsylvania, killing all 44 aboard. A preliminary review of the jet's flight data recorder indicated that it turned on its back and flew relatively straight into the ground, sources said.

President Bush and other government officials say the passengers' actions may have saved an untold number of lives on Sept. 11, when three other teams of hijackers led attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Several passengers were aware that the hijackings earlier that day ended in suicide crashes. The attacks in New York and Washington left thousands dead or missing.

Authorities have asked outside experts to analyze the recorder a second time in an attempt to glean more from its contents. The use of filters and other computer analysis of cockpit voice recorders is common after an accident.

The recorder is a modern digital model and produced a high-quality record of the last 30 minutes of the flight.

Voice recorders store sounds from microphones that pilots wear on their headsets and from a microphone embedded in the cockpit wall to capture ambient sounds. Normally, it is easy to determine who is speaking on a recording because the voice can be linked to a specific headset. But sounds on the Flight 93 recording come primarily from the cockpit wall microphone, making it more difficult to decipher.

Investigators also are examining a tape of short radio broadcasts from the jet, apparently at the time hijackers took control of the cockpit. Sources who have heard the tape say it recorded a gruesome, violent struggle.

Flight 93 was headed from Newark, N.J., to San Francisco when it was hijacked. Because the jet crashed more than 30 minutes after the hijacking, the recording did not capture the takeover of the cockpit.

Thursday September 13, 6:34 PM- 22 Japanese missing after US terror attacks - TOKYO, Sept 13 (AFP) -


Japan's government said Thursday 22 of its nationals were missing after the plane hijackings and terror attacks in the United States. "We have 22 people missing at this moment. Of them, 20 were at the World Trade Center and two are believed to have been on board" the hijacked aircraft, a foreign ministry official told AFP.

Japanese financial institutions with offices in the devastated World Trade Center towers said they had not given up the search for workers missing in the rubble left by the worst terrorist attack in history.

"We are trying every possible method we can think of. We still hope we can find them somewhere," said Yukio Yokoyama, a spokesman for Fuji Bank, 12 of whose 125 Japanese staff and about 50 of 500 local hires are unaccounted for. Yokoyama said the bank was in regular contact with the Japan-based families of its missing workers.

"They haven't given up yet," he said.

Two employees of Nishi Nippon Bank, whose offices were on the 102nd floor of One World Trade Center, were winding up their work before relocating back to Japan.

The three-man office had shut down five days earlier and the bank was about to pull out of New York for good, said Nishi Nippon spokesman Kenshi Shigeto.

One of the workers was about to enter the building Tuesday morning as American Airlines Flight 11 smashed into its side, he said. The staffer, who is single, survived and the search was continuing for the two other workers.

"They were just taking care of final affairs," said Shigeto from the bank's head office in Fukuoka. "We believe they are alive and are anxiously hoping for any information to confirm that."

Fuji Bank's offices occupied floors 79 to 82 of Two World Trade Center, the southern tower which collapsed 47 minutes after being hit by United Airlines Flight 175, the second jet to crash.

Some sixteen Japanese banks, securities firms and insurance companies had offices in the twin towers, employing hundreds of Japanese staff and more than 1,000 local hires.

"We are in the midst of looking" for new offices, said a spokesman for Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank, which took up the 48th through 50th floors of One World Trade Center. The bank had 80 Japanese employees and 273 locally hired staff in the destroyed buildings, with two unaccounted for.

Along with the financial sector workers affected by the New York attack, two missing Japanese citizens were on flight lists of planes that were hijacked and then crashed on their suicide missions.

Aoyama Saima, a 48-year-old worker with the Buddhist organization Sokka Gakkai International, was aboard American Flight 11, which smashed into the north tower. Second-year Waseda University student Toshiya Kuge, 20, was on holiday and scheduled to be on United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed 130 kilometersmiles) southeast of Pittsburgh. "We are still hoping for his safety," said Waseda spokesman Yoshiaki Iizuka.

Wednesday October 03 02:57 PM EDT - Powell Says U.S. Had Signs, but Not Clear Ones, of a Plot
By JANE PERLEZ and DAVID E. SANGER The New York Times
Despite extensive efforts, intelligence agencies failed to pick up enough information to stop the Sept. 11 attacks, the secretary of state said.


WASHINGTON, Oct. 2 Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said today that the Bush administration had received a "lot of signs" that terrorists were planning attacks against the United States but extensive efforts by intelligence agencies failed to pick up enough information to stop the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington. Early this summer "there were a lot of signs that there was something going on," Secretary Powell said. "But we never got the fidelity and the information that we would have liked to, some warning of what did actually happen."

In looking back today in an interview in his State Department suite, Secretary Powell expressed frustration that, despite a summer of warnings of possible terrorist actions against American civilian and military sites around the world, the information was not sufficient to identify the specific targets that were struck last month. "The intelligence agencies were trying," he said. "We were watchful throughout all of our embassy systems."

Mr. Powell praised George Tenet, the director of central intelligence, a holdover from the Clinton administration. The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is urging far-reaching changes in intelligence operations and an independent investigation into why the government did not foresee or prevent the Sept. 11 attacks. While he was generally upbeat in his accounting of the progress so far in the global campaign against terror, he made it clear that the administration was still at the early stages of winning full cooperation from allied and other nations.

For example, despite pledges of cooperation, Saudi Arabia has not yet said publicly that the United States would be able to use air bases there for offensive operations against targets in Afghanistan. Secretary Powell insisted that the administration is demonstrating to allies and moderate Arab governments that the case against Osama bin Laden and his network is convincing. He asserted that "all paths" lead to Mr. bin Laden and his Al Qaeda network, although he cautioned not to see it in terms of a case "that's going to trial in a court."

Instead, administration officials have been briefing allies on what he called "pretty good information" establishing the link between the airplane hijackers and Mr. bin Laden. "It's a campaign in many parts and pieces all working to go after a common enemy," Secretary Powell said. "That enemy's name is terrorism. And in its most ambitious manifestation it goes by the name Al Qaeda and the head of that awful holding company is bin Laden and he is responsible for tragedy against humanity, crime against the American people, crime against the civilized world and he must be held accountable."

Secretary Powell described in general terms the cable that has been sent to American embassies around the world outlining the case against Mr. bin Laden. He said it describes the history of the terrorist network, and recites existing indictments filed against Mr. bin Laden for his alleged involvement in the 1998 bombings of two American Embassies in East Africa. It also describes evidence of Mr. bin Laden's responsibility "for past crimes against the U.S. and against civilization," presumably including the attack last year on the American destroyer Cole in Yemen.

While the administration has not made any documents public, as General Powell suggested that it might 10 days ago, he said today that "over time enough information would surface" to convince the American people. "The case will never be able to be described as circumstantial," he said. "It's not circumstantial now." Secretary Powell also touched, gingerly, on the political future of Afghanistan. Despite a policy statement from the Bush administration last week stating that the Taliban does not represent the Afghan people, General Powell stopped well short of saying that the overthrow of the hard-line Islamic government is an explicit goal.

"Our goal in the first instance as the president has laid out is to go after Al Qaeda and its leader bin Laden and its camps in Afghanistan," he said. "And the Taliban regime will pay a price." Addressing the possibilty that the Taliban might not survive the coming confrontation, Secretary Powell said he hoped for the emergence of a new government that would be "representative" of the many ethnic groups that make up the Afghan people. "Hopefully, the Afghan people can find themselves under the leadership of a government that is representative of all the Afghan people and is a less repressive government than the kind that is there now." He held out the possibility of substantial economic assistance once the Taliban is out of the way.

Already the Bush administration has made available $170 million in relief aid, and officials suggested this weekend that another $100 million would be on the way by the end of the year. Secretary Powell said that figure would rise, and the United States would try to bring "some level of stability in their society." "We would see what we could do to put the country on a more secure footing," he said. "You're not doing your job if you are not thinking of future opportunities and possibilities."

Asked how he would define victory in the long campaign ahead, Secretary Powell gave a broad and ambitious definition one that centered more on how Americans felt than any specific military victory. "I see the success of this campaign being measured in the restoration of a degree of security in society, where people are not as frightened as they are now," he said.

He added that another measure of success would come "when there is less terrorism, far less, preferably zero terrorism with a global reach of the world." President Bush has often said many victories would arise from covert operations, never seen by the American people. But Secretary Powell said: "Even covert activities eventually produce visible results." Asked about his newly disclosed plans to declare that the administration supports the creation of a Palestinian state as part of a settlement in the Middle East, Secretary Powell said he had not decided when or where to outline his views.

After staying aloof from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for most of the year, the administration was about to dive in when the Sept. 11 attacks occurred. Those attacks delayed the opening of the United Nations General Assembly in New York, where Mr. Bush had been planning to meet the Palestinian leader, Yasir Arafat, and Mr. Powell had been planning to deliver a speech outlining the administration's ideas for resolving the conflict. Today, Secretary Powell suggested that when that initiative resumed would depend on events in Afghanistan.

The intelligence warnings about terrorist attacks that Secretary Powell discussed today were received during the spring and summer, particularly before the Fourth of July and the summit meeting of industrialized nations in Genoa, Italy, that month. Vice President Dick Cheney referred to those reports in an hourlong interview on "Meet the Press" on Sept. 16 when he said that the government had information that a "big operation" was planned. But, like Secretary Powell today, Mr. Cheney said there was "no specific threat involving really a domestic operation."

Secretary Powell suggested that the State Department and the intelligence agencies had been on high alert against terrorism, and had been trying, though its embassies abroad, to home in on Mr. bin Laden's plans. But twice he said that the American intelligence gathering effort never came up with enough "fidelity" a word that seemed to suggest that they either misunderstood the signals they were receiving, or simply did not have enough specific data.

"There were a number of reports that we were worried about but that never crystallized," he said. "There were a lot of signs that there was something going on nobody could ever get the fidelity in those reports." In June and early July, United States intelligence officials warned that Mr. bin Laden and Al Qaeda appeared to be planning terrorist attacks against American interests. Those warnings prompted public alerts by the administration of possible terrorist attacks timed for the Fourth of July holidays.

When no attacks occurred around July 4, American intelligence officials began to assume that the immediate threat had passed. In retrospect, some American officials say that their focus on that holiday may have been a misreading of the information they had received. All through June and July, the State Department released reports warning that terrorist attacks were imminent in locations from the Mideast to East Asia. In July, for example, the department warned about possible attacks against installations in Japan and South Korea, as well as against American interests in the Arabian Peninsula.

 

 

 The Attack on the World Trade Center of September 11, 2001 is considered the worst disaster in the history of the United States of America.

September 11, 2001: Timeline of Terrorism - A DAY OF INFAMY
by David Johnson

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Aftermath
All times are Eastern Daylight Time
8:45 a.m. American Airlines Flight 11, Boston to Los Angeles with 92 people onboard, crashes into the north tower of the World Trade Center in New York City.
9:03 a.m. United Airlines Flight 175, Boston to Los Angeles with 65 people onboard, flies into the south tower of the World Trade Center.
9:31 a.m. Speaking from Florida, President George Bush pledges the United States will hunt down the guilty parties.
9:40 a.m. American Flight 77, en route from Dulles Airport, Washington DC, to Los Angeles with 64 people onboard, crashes into the Pentagon.
9:48 a.m. The U.S. Capitol and the West Wing of the White House are evacuated.
9:49 a.m. The Federal Aviation Administration bans all aircraft takeoffs in the United States.

9:50 a.m. South tower of the World Trade Center collapses.
9:58 a.m. Emergency operator in Pennsylvania receives a call from a passenger on United Flight 93, Newark to San Francisco with 45 people onboard, stating the plane was being hijacked.
10:00 a.m. United Flight 93 crashes about 80 miles southeast of Pittsburgh.
10:29 a.m. North tower of the World Trade Center collapses.
11:00 a.m. New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani orders lower Manhattan evacuated.
11:40 a.m. With U.S. military on nuclear alert, Bush taken to Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana.
1:20 p.m. Bush boards Air Force One for Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska, headquarters of the U.S. Strategic Air Command.
2:51 p.m. U.S. military deploys missile destroyers and other equipment in New York and Washington.
5:20 p.m. Another World Trade Center building collapses.
7:00 p.m. Bush arrives in Washington.
8:31 p.m. Bush addresses the nation, vowing to punish "evil acts."

 

Thursday September 20 7:51 PM ET
More Than 6,300 Said Missing at WTC
By LARRY McSHANE, Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK (AP) - The number of missing in America's worst terrorist attack soared Thursday to 6,333, with hundreds of foreigners added to the list of victims feared dead beneath the crumbled World Trade Center. The number had been 5,422 for several days.

SEVEN DAYS LATER: Tuesday, September 18
*Pakistani officials and Taliban leaders end two days of negotiations with no agreement.
*A moment of silence is held at 8:48 am EDT in New York and Washington, exactly one week after the first plane struck the World Trade Center. "Reality of the chance of recovering anyone alive (from WTC wreckage) is very, very small," says Mayor Giuliani.
*The official number of missing at the World Trade Center rises to 5,422; 218 confirmed dead.
*French President Jacques Chirac meets with President Bush, pledges French solidarity NYSE rebounds with help of retail and manufacturing companies.
*Some Broadway shows will close early due to revenue losses.
*Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta meets with airline executives to discuss safety and financial issues; Bush and Congress prepare legislative aid package for the industry.

SIX DAYS LATER: Monday, September 17
*Attorney General Ashcroft says federal marshals will be flying on many commercial flights. "It's very likely there was significant ground support and reinforcement assistance from collaborators" in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, says *Attorney General Ashcroft. The IMF and World Bank cancel their annual meetings, which were to take place later this month in Washington, D.C. Pakistani envoys meet with Taliban leaders to urge the extradition of Osama bin Laden. *Wall Street reopens after longest closing since 1933; Dow logs its greatest point loss ever.
*Federal Reserve lowers interest rates.
*Major league baseball pennant race resumes.
*Airlines losing millions; more layoffs to come.
*Bush says bin Laden is wanted "dead or alive."
*Pakistan essentially closes its border with Afghanistan; an estimated 1 million Afghan refugees are confined to northern camps.

FIFTH DAY: Sunday, September 16
*Investigators learn three hijackers may have attended the same German university, the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg.
*Attorney General John Ashcroft asks Congress to write tougher anti-terrorist laws and to expand the powers of law enforcement to use wire-tapping.
*190 confirmed dead at World Trade Center.
*Memorial service takes place at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City.
*Vice President Cheney tells press President Bush authorized F-16 fighters to shoot down hijacked planes heading toward Washington, D.C.
*Mayor Giuliani now says over 4,900 reported missing.
*Mayor Giuliani dispels rumors of tapping heard in the WTC wreckage.
*Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta announc
es he appointed two task forces to report on improving air security.


FOURTH DAY: Saturday, September 15
*President Bush meets with senior advisors at Camp David.
*DNA testing will be used to identify remains; families and loved ones of missing asked to bring in hairbrushes, razors, and other items for DNA analysis.
*Continental Airlines annouces 12,000 layoffs; Continental, American, United, Northwest to cut schedules.
*Funeral services held for New York City's Fire Department:
Chief Peter Ganci, First Deputy Fire Commissioner William Feehan, and department chaplain Father Mychal Judge.

THIRD DAY: Friday, September 14
*SEC relaxes rules on company buybacks.
*Afghan refugees flee to Iranian and Pakistani borders.
*Suspects flown from Texas and Minnesota to New York for questioning.
*President Bush declares a national emergency.
*The Senate adopts a resolution authorizing the use of U.S. armed forces against those responsible for the attacks.
*President Bush visits World Trade Center site.
*Federal officials release names of the 19 hijackers.
*President Bush declares a "national day of prayer and remembrance." Many Americans attend religious services.
*Congress unanimously approves $40 billion for emergency aid.
*Suspects detained at New York airports cleared and released.
*President Bush activates 50,000 national guard and reserve members to help with recovery and security.
*Flight data and voice recorders found at the Pentagon crash site.

SECOND DAY AFTER: Thursday, September 13
Ten suspects detained at New York airports; some said to be carrying fake credentials and knives.
Family and friends of WTC victims fill out missing person reports at the Lexington Street Armory.
Flight data and voice recorders found at the Pennsylvania crash site.
Secretary of State Colin Powell names Osama bin Laden as main suspect.
German police detain suspect in Hamburg.
U.S. urges on Pakistan to close its borders with Afghanistan.
President Bush visits survivors of Pentagon attack.
Mayor Giuliani estimates over 4,000 dead in New York.
European Union declares Friday, September 14, a day of mourning.
U.S. airports begin reopening; Boston's Logan and D.C.'s Reagan airports remain closed.
U.S. bond markets open.


DAY AFTER ATTACK: Wednesday, September 12
*Officials estimate 200 dead, including hijacking victims, at the Pentagon.
*Osama bin Laden denies involvement.
*The Taliban, of Afghanistan, denies foreknowledge of attacks.
*4,000 FBI and CIA agents involved in the investigation.
*Families report receiving calls from victims of hijackings.
*Major league baseball games, NFL games, Emmys, and other major events postponed.
*For the first time NATO invokes Article V of the North Atlantic Treaty,
which states that an armed attack on one member nation "shall be considered an attack against them all".
*Four suspects in Boston and Rhode Island detained and released.
*Investigations lead police to flight-training schools in Florida.
*List of victims from hijacked planes released.
*Relatives, friends search for survivors in area hospitals.
*Almost 100 confirmed dead in New York.
*Americans line up at blood donation centers.
*Rental car found at Boston's Logan airport contains Arabic-language flight manuals.
*Flags fly at half-staff around the world.
*U.S. financial markets closed.
*U.S. airports closed.

 

 

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